Category Archives: 04.3 Materials and process

Projection Mapping

I have had notes on this technique in my research folder since October 2014 – so it is with a little amusement that I finally get to dig them out now. I had originally been playing with the idea of lighting (before getting put off working in ceramics), where I wanted to project patterns onto the inside of paperclay tubes. This idea went nowhere, but it meant this long planted seed was already in place before coming across the projection mapping of poetry from last week’s blog.

I have followed this up a little more, and found some interesting examples of projection mapping onto sculpture – although this seems much less common than using stacks of weird shaped boxes, or projection onto large buildings. This example is pretty stunning:

The piece was created by creative agency Blow Factory and the woodwork was done by Caprinteria Tabares. What’s great about this is how the projection mapping exploits the wood grain and surface texture, resulting in beautiful movement of light and pattern.

So, to test this I have to work in a few stages – firstly, figure out how projection mapping works, then see how to animate my own calligraphy into video, and thirdly (and not insignificantly) decide upon the installation of threads to project onto…so, one thing at a time!

This was a basic test of the two techniques in my home studio using some open source software I found online (you can’t see in this still, but the handwriting is in fact animated)

20160405_180345

I did a few tests with projecting the images and words onto the threads. However, in order to get this to work, I need to manage the fact that they are….well, threads. As there are gaps between them, the projections will only be seen where there is more density or a solid surface, particularly if it is text. Now that I know I can handle the basics of the technique, the next task I think is to be sure I know what I want the threads to be like/represent before moving on.

The big question, before I get too deep to turn back, is this the right thing for the show?

Advertisements

Storytelling with colour

After my last post, I had a nice chat with the lovely Bridget and tested my provisional show plan with her. Her reaction was good (apparently my ideas have much more me-ness in it). She noted the ethereality apparent within both the paper weaving samples and my latest calligraphic poems. [I don’t think I have talked about these on the blog yet – so as a quick summary, I have started looking at my ‘place identity’ using my asemic, consciousness poetry – calligraphy on top of monoprinting]

wp-1454350447520.jpeg

So after meeting with Bridget, I’ve been making more weaving samples, experimenting with different ways of mark-making using the weave. I’d like to incorporate my story physically into the weave (as opposed as to just writing on top of it).

The latest samples:

wp-1454350260774.jpegwp-1454350250742.jpegwp-1454350247803.jpeg

I love the effects with the colour pieces, and am less convinced by literally weaving in the words. Not sure this looks great and it is just too……well, too readable perhaps? I tried different warp dyeing experiment following on from this, which turned into a horrible mess. I then decided to follow this with baking a batch of chocolate muffins (after giving away 16 cakes yesterday), only for this to result in a horrible mess too and end up in the kitchen bin. Urg.

Some days go like this I suppose!

Something different then, and instead of making, I’m thinking about form instead. What object am I creating with all of these weaves? Something wistful and ethereal with fragments of words and poetry drifting into and out of focus at certain points? Oooh, I like the sound of that [blogging is a great way to empty the mind, instead of just talking to yourself]. I have been wondering about the forms I made in Unit 1 – looking back to pieces such as desire line from last September. Can I do basketry with pieces of weaving, would this be some sort of meta-weave?  This is conceptually very attractive.

Initial 3-fold and 5-fold paper maquettes and a quick material test with the samples I’ve got so far. I think I may need to find a form that is a little more open.

wp-1454350238416.jpegwp-1454350243615.jpeg

 

 

Turning towards the show

Time is running short and I need to start formulating a plan for the final show. There is still a little time to test – and the faster we have a plan, the faster we can begin testing each element.

Let’s begin with a re-statement of my final project proposal:

I am investigating the concept of self by examining the subjective reality we construct as we experience the world. By unravelling our sense of self as strands of multiple co-exisiting identities, I am looking at how these strands are built from places which become part of us through our lives. Shadows of real and imagined places embed themselves into the self, an interconnection of experience, memory and fiction. These shadows haunt us as we pass through the spaces of the world, generates belonging, displacement, familiarity or isolation.

My project is based upon the process of weaving, as it echoes my ideas of universality and locality: a single cloth constructed from countless individual strands. Within the fibres, I am seeking an expression of the complexity of our existence. Fragments of past, present and future co-existing for a fleeting moment, never to reform.  I am interested in bringing in my poetry and asemic calligraphy work into my fibre work – combining the the abstract and conceptual influences with the physical, viscerality of making. As of yet, I don’t know how I’m doing this…but let’s see if I can update this paragraph in a few months time!

To experimentation then….

Well, I started by going back to weaving paper yarns, and looking to see if I could incorporate marks onto the woven cloth. This piece was tested by painting the warp with my calligraphy ink.

wp-1453831694717.jpegwp-1453831682052.jpeg

Then I followed this will another experiment using raw silk yarn and playing a little with the tension of the loom, seeing what changes in texture this would make by itself, without needing to paint over any marks in ink:

wp-1453834130125.jpegwp-1453833972463.jpeg

So far the paper is winning!

The materiality of maps mini-project

I’ve been trying to concentrate on doing rather than thinking, so it has been a while since I’ve updated on progress. This will be a summary in two parts, reflecting the two areas of focus I am working with. This first post looks at the key point of feedback from my Unit 1 Assessment: “be more materially-led”. I started back in November looking at the idea of a map as material and seeing where it would take me.

In this post I started some ‘material sketches’, in particular a traditional-style patchwork piece which brought together significant places I cut out of an old map of where I grew up (Northumbria/South Scotland). I had written the story of why those places meant so much to me on each hexagon.

2015-11-25 15.09.15

From here I had commented on the signigfance of the stitching at the time, but on reflection was more fascinated by the bit of the map that was left behind after cutting. I said in my next map post that “There was something sad, sorrowful about the remnants. The leftover places which were devoided of all meaning through my act of cutting”.

20160107_141038

This took me to look more at the act of cutting to see what could be revealed though absence and incompleteness. This was quite fun actually, the process was relatively random – with no plan or meaning attached to how each map page was cut, simply an act of repetition going on through the A to Z. I moved away from the hexagon (a very quilting related shape) and moved to the more abstract circles.

DSC_0236DSC_0222

After this I had a bit of a break for Christmas and on getting back to my desk this week wasn’t really sure how to move on next. I started by playing with the pieces which had been cut out of the London AtoZ – using stitching and then folding.

20160104_16372920160104_154937

I then took a step back and went back to the idea of cutting a whole map, but this time being more selective on what to extract. I have acquired a absolutely fabulous set of old OS maps which I am using as source material. In this set I found a map of the place where I grew up on Tyneside. Having spent a lifetime with so much of my identity resonating with rivers, seas and waters (in no small part down to my fish-crazed dad), I was instantly drawn to the representation of the river, the shard of bright blue signing out amongst the city.

20160104_17102520160104_17103720160104_171237

I really liked these samples, there is something compelling about how the map looks once its lifeblood (and the reason the city existed in the beginning) was ripped away from the people and places around it. I thought to repeat this process on a bigger map and a different place, thinking more about the idea of deconstruction of place into constituent parts. I came across a map of my adopted home, so took that one, seeing what the material nature of the map would tell me about cutting or not cutting. This is what resulted:

DSC_0420DSC_0415DSC_0410

(in case you aren’t sure of the scale, fully laid out it’s about 1m x 1m)

I am quite pleased with this so far, and it is beginning to be more clearly influenced by the bigger context of my project (more on this in my next post). Now the question is where to go next from these samples?

Mapping identity

Mulling in the post-Christmas haze this week, and having found some quiet time at my drawing table I decided to do some more experiments with ink and water and my stream of consciousness poetry.

I am still looking to my MA project inspiration for the backdrop for the work (in context if not yet in process/material), so ideas around questioning identity and place, a sense of anachronism, loss and isolation. Overlaying different versions of ourselves again and again as each moment creates a new sense of self – infinitesimal changes which mean we are never the same again.

DSC_0267

DSC_0293DSC_0284DSC_0287

DSC_0274DSC_0273_01

More experimental calligraphy

I cannot deny that I am a lover of words. I have worked with stream of consciousness poetry in my personal art journalling and calligraphy for many years. I haven’t found any way to get this into my work for my MA. I realise now how critical this is to my future practice – so want to start looking into how i can explore bringing the ‘two sides’ of my work together.

Today, I went back into expressive mark making mode and did some experimental ink drawings, using my lettering as a textural backdrop.

DSC_0243DSC_0251_01DSC_0252DSC_0250DSC_0249_01

More making with maps

Following on from the map patchwork I did the other day, I was wondering what to do in response. I began playing with the leftover maps which had all of the hexagons – my meaningful places – cut out. There was something sad, sorrowful about the remnants. The leftover places which were devoided of all meaning through my act of cutting.

I decided then to take this idea and repeat it with another map, purposefully looking at the negative spaces as opposed to the ‘meaningful spaces’. This was the result:

DSC_0242DSC_0236DSC_0222

I like the depth, the sense of overlapping stories being layered upon each other – hidden and partial histories revealed. Something gained in absence which is obscured in completeness.